Blog

  • Lead. Serve. Create.

    Welcome to the Fellows' Blog

    Every other week from September through February meet us back here to find a new post by our 2017-2018 cohort of Ethiopian Diaspora Fellows.

  • Our Fellows

    Saba Alemnew

    Saba holds a Bachelor of Arts in International Relations and a minor in Communications from the University of California, Davis. Upon graduation, she joined Triage Consulting Group as a Consultant providing reimbursement review services for some of the largest health systems in the United States.

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  • Our Fellows

    Maceda Alemu

    Maceda Afework Alemu graduated from Dartmouth College in June 2014. At Dartmouth, she majored in Geography with a focus on International Development, minored in International Relations and completed a certificate in Global Health Studies. After graduation, she served as a Program Coordinator with the Center for Health Equity at the Geisel School of Medicine.

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  • Our Fellows

    Meron Begashaw

    Meron Begashaw is a recent graduate of the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health - she graduated with a Master’s degree in Public Health. Prior to and during graduate school, Meron held a number of health-related positions, including program assistant at The California Wellness Foundation working in women's health and diversity in the health professions and an intern at Kaiser Permanente Medical Center and the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.

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  • Our Fellows

    Eden Mekonen

    Eden Mekonen graduated from Occidental College where she majored in Critical Theory and Social Justice and minored in Interdisciplinary Writing. While at Occidental, Eden became passionate about equitable, multicultural education and diverse representations of underrepresented groups, through community-based learning classes where she applied identity-based theoretical frameworks to community social issues. She is interested in participating in the capacity building of programs and activities, and believes this allows for sustainability as opposed to dependency.

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A Tale of Two Homes

By Ebanezare Tadele

I remember my reaction when I was 13 and my parents first told my brothers and I that we were going to be in Ethiopia for the summer. What business did we have in Ethiopia? Ethiopia wasn’t my home, it was theirs. Going to Ethiopia didn’t make sense to me- after all, isn’t this the country they fled from? It didn’t seem very appealing to go to a developing country that the media portrays as being plagued with famine, poverty, and AIDS especially when the alternative was summer break. I had no idea that Ethiopia would end up being the place where I would want to spend the rest of my life.

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New Year, New Perspective

By Liat Desta

My journey of self-realization started a few days before the Ethiopian New Year, Pagume 3rd or September 8th. My coworker was explaining to me the significance of this date, the Orthodox holiday of Rufael. This holiday is eagerly awaited by believers of the Orthodox faith because it is said that this day’s rainfall is holy water. It is a blessing where you should not cover yourself, but instead, get wet and receive the blessing. Then a few days later, it (finally) became 2008 in Ethiopia. Every New Year is seen as a chance for one to start over, to break old habits, start a healthier lifestyle, and set goals to become a better version of oneself. Yet, there have been three times in this past month that have given me more clarity on me and my identity than I have ever had in my entire life—this fellowship, Rufael, and Enkutatash (New Year’s).

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More than Just a Number

By Eden Mesfin

It’s hard to describe my connection with Ethiopia as a Diaspora. I was raised to love my Ethiopian culture, history, and heritage since the day I was born. Yet, my only memory and my first trip to Ethiopia was five years ago – when I went to bury my mother. My tie to Ethiopia was embedded in my mother’s passing. However, I found that although returning to Ethiopia would be painful, it was something I desperately wanted and needed. Coming to Ethiopia would begin a new chapter of my identity as an Ethiopian.

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